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Demo Day presenters receive a round of applause after the 13 presentations. The 13 were chosen from a pool of over 50 applicants to present during Startup@Kauffman day. Photo courtesy of the Kauffman Foundation

Kansas City Entrepreneurs Showcased at Demo Day



Demo Day presenters receive a round of applause after the 13 presentations. The 13 were chosen from a pool of over 50 applicants to present during Startup@Kauffman day.
Demo Day presenters receive a round of applause after the 13 presentations. The 13 were chosen from a pool of over 50 applicants to present during Startup@Kauffman day. Photo courtesy of the Kauffman Foundation

KANSAS CITY – Entrepreneurs at “One Week KC” are coming up with new ways to do everything from revving up international money transfers to giving bored commuters their daily news.

Demo Day,” a series of 13 presentations from Kansas City-based startups, aims to rouse KC’s entrepreneurial spirit and help local inventors find advisors or perhaps their first customers.

Thad Langford, who emceed Demo Day, said great startup communities provide a steady flow of activities and events to get ideas into the public forum connect entrepreneurs with their customers.

“At a minimum, I want everybody in this room to walk out of here excited and proud of the types of businesses and startups that are being built under your nose,” Langford said.

Demo day presenters showcased their solutions to social and business conundrums. Jessica Bishop of Klink Mobile unveiled a mobile platform for international money transfer, which she said can get bogged down in expense and inconvenience through traditional means.

Bruce Hopkins of Kaliki said his company set out to solve two problems—the boredom of auto commuters and the declining fortunes of the news publishing industry—with their “Audio Newsstand” platform, which provides audio versions of newspapers and magazines to mobile devices.

Michael Peck of KC BioMedix introduces his medical device company that focuses on developing new diagnostic tools and therapeutic technologies for neonatal care for the 12.5 million premature infants born worldwide each year. Photo courtesy of the Kauffman Foundation

Other presenters sought to tackle issues in education, health care and road infrastructure. One presented a mobile app that connects fans with musicians during concerts. Another showed off EyeVerify, a technology that uses eye scans to authorize online transactions.

Whether it was replacing the tradition post-rock show lighters for audiences with a phone app (such as the one included inConcert’s “Amp’d” platform), or using video games to teach kids computer programming (as the “Prodigy Arcade does), the presenting entrepreneurs were trying to use new technologies to solve problems, both old and new.

“This part of the day is truly the real deal,” Langford said.

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