Global Glance: Bank of Japan tweaks policy; Comcast to launch wireless service

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Here are today’s top business headlines from across the nation and world:

3 things to watch for from the Federal Reserve on Wednesday

WASHINGTON (AP) — Not quite yet. That’s the decision the Federal Reserve is expected to deliver Wednesday when it announces to the financial world whether it will resume raising interest rates now – or wait until later, perhaps sometime soon. Most economists say they think the Fed wants more time to evaluate the U.S. economy, measure the risks emanating from abroad and assess whether inflation will soon reach the policymakers’ 2 percent target rate. In the end, most Fed watchers think the next rate increase won’t come before December. Read more


Bank of Japan tweaks policy, but keeps interest rate unchanged

TOKYO (AP) — Japan’s central bank opted Wednesday to keep its policies mostly unchanged, with some technical adjustments to how it controls interest rates. The adjustments to the Bank of Japan’s policies were widely anticipated, though many analysts had been expecting an interest rate cut or other more aggressive moves to perk up sluggish growth in the world’s No. 3 economy. Read more


Comcast plans to launch wireless service next year

NEW YORK (AP) — Comcast plans to launch a cellphone service roughly in the middle of next year, although it would be limited to areas of the country where it’s a cable provider. That could potentially offer real competition to carriers like Verizon and AT&T for a subset of the country. Comcast has just over 28 million customers. The cable giant plans to create a service that would run on its 15 million Wi-Fi hotspots and use Verizon’s wireless network, which it has a deal to resell. Read more


Peppered with questions, Wells Fargo CEO seemed taken aback

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing bipartisan outrage from a Senate panel over accusations of employee misconduct, Well Fargo CEO John Stumpf appeared taken aback by the intensity of the verbal lashing. At a few points, he seemed flustered and stumbled a bit over his words. He bristled at assertions that the alleged opening of millions of customer accounts without their permission was a “scam.” Peppered with criticism for nearly three hours at a hearing Tuesday, the CEO of the nation’s second-largest bank faced calls for his resignation from harshly critical senators. They pressed Stumpf about claims from regulators that Wells Fargo employees opened the unauthorized accounts, transferred customers’ money into them, and even signed people up for online banking in a feverish drive to meet sales targets. Read more


Mylan CEO set to defend EpiPen prices amid public outcry

WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of pharmaceutical company Mylan is defending the cost for life-saving EpiPens, signaling the company has no plans to lower prices despite a public outcry and questions from skeptical lawmakers. “Price and access exist in a balance, and we believe we have struck that balance,” Heather Bresch says in prepared testimony released by the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee ahead of her Wednesday appearance before the panel. Read more


Chipotle makes new push to convince people its food is safe

NEW YORK (AP) — Chipotle is making another push to convince people that its food won’t make them sick, with plans to run more newspaper and digital ads outlining the safety steps it has taken since last year’s E. coli outbreak. The ads beginning Wednesday will be an open letter from co-CEO Steve Ells, who also recorded a video that will be promoted online. The move underscores the Denver-based company’s struggle to rebound from a series of food scares and extinguish any doubts that its burritos and bowls are safe to eat. Read more


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